The state of California will start the year with new workplace laws!



Some new laws were already signed by the Governor earlier this year and have already gone into effect. Unless otherwise noted, the rest of the new laws will go into effect on January 1, 2023. The following is our article below summarizes the notable new laws. Employers should start reviewing these requirements to help ensure compliance with the series of new laws. New Labor Laws in California The Labor Commissioner’s Office provides information and resources for workers and employers on new laws in California. The materials below explain new labor laws that apply to many workplaces in California. Labor law posters are the mandated state and federal employment law notices that employers with at least one employee or more are required to have. Failure to display the correct employment law notices can result in penalties, fines, and lawsuits. Stay in compliance! the works' compensation poster here



The Garment Worker Protection Act (Senate Bill 62) Senate Bill 62, also known as the Garment Worker Protection Act, went into effect on January 1, 2022. The new law addresses the proper payment of employees in the garment industry and the responsibility of parties contracting to have garment operations performed in several important ways.

Recall Rights (SB 93) Employees of specific hospitality and service industry employers who were laid off for COVID-19-related reasons must be notified of job openings for the same or similar positions as the ones they last held. They must be offered available jobs, with priority based on length of service, before new employees can be hired. Warehouse Quotas (Assembly Bill 701)

Assembly Bill 701 went into effect on January 1, 2022. Warehouse workers in California now have protections from quotas that violate labor laws. Employers must also provide information on quotas that employees have to meet while working


Minimum Wage $15.00/hour Phase in from 2017-2023 (Senate Bill 3)

In 2017, Senate Bill 3 started a phase-in of requirements to raise California’s minimum wage to $15.00 an hour. The increase in the minimum wage is different for large employers (26 or more employees) and small employers (25 or fewer employees). Starting January 1, 2022, the minimum wage is $15.00 an hour for large employers and $14.00 an hour for small employers. If a local entity (city or county) has adopted a higher minimum wage, employees must be paid the local wage, which it is higher than the state or federal minimum wage rates.

Overtime for Agriculture Workers (Assembly Bill 1066) In 2016, Assembly Bill 1066 created a timetable for agricultural workers to receive overtime pay so that they will gradually receive overtime pay on the same basis as workers in most other industries (after 8 hours per day or 40 hours per week). Starting January 1, 2022, employers with 26 or more employees must pay agriculture workers overtime after 8 hours in a day or 40 hours in a week. Employers with 25 or fewer employees must pay agriculture workers overtime after 9.5 hours per day or 55 hours per week.

Labor law posters are the mandated state and federal employment law notices that employers with at least one employee or more are required to have. Failure to display the correct employment law notices can result in penalties, fines, and lawsuits.

Stay in compliance! Download the works' compensation poster here Do you have other questions? Contact us TODAY! And get a free quote with the best coverage that fits your budget!

Source: https://www.dir.ca.gov/dlse/Garment/New-Labor-Laws-in-California.html

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EPIA inc. is a private Insurance Agency with no ties with legal entities. The information contained in this article is based on information provided by the Medicare Official Website.


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